Sift - Installation view
       
     
Sift - Installation view (details)
       
     
Kernohan-Sift-Installation Detail-2.jpg
       
     
Kernohan-Sift-Installation Detail-3.jpg
       
     
Sift # 35
       
     
Sift # 38
       
     
Chipped
       
     
Untitled
       
     
Sift - Installation view
       
     
Sift - Installation view

2015; Graphite, water and vinegar on mylar

Sift is a drawing installation influenced by my experiences in nature, most recently a five-day hike along the Lagavegur Trail in Iceland. The drawings recall this walk through a landscape that was at times out-of-focus, while at others absolutely clear, providing the landscape with an evocative and ever-shifting identity. Each drawing represents a process of trying to understand and re-create the way that sediment settles and deposits on snowfields after a season of storms.

Sift - Installation view (details)
       
     
Sift - Installation view (details)

2015 Graphite, water and vinegar on mylar

Kernohan-Sift-Installation Detail-2.jpg
       
     
Kernohan-Sift-Installation Detail-3.jpg
       
     
Sift # 35
       
     
Sift # 35

2014; Graphite, water and vinegar on mylar

These drawings are made by sifting, pouring, and allowing matter to settle, which mimic the sedimentation process. I use mixtures of graphite, water and vinegar, which is poured onto the surface of large sheets of mylar. Like sediment that has settled on the landscape after the rush of a flood, graphite becomes embedded into the surface of the paper. Other times the graphite is washed away, like sediment after a heavy rainfall. As a result, the drawings are atmospheric.

Sift # 38
       
     
Sift # 38

2014; Graphite, water and vinegar on mylar

Chipped
       
     
Chipped

2014; Collage

Using rocks from my personal collection as source material, I attempt to rebuilt the larger geological features from which they have originated from of collaged photographic fragments.  

The surfaces of these collages are not uniform. There are junctures where its texture shifts in new directions. Sometimes these junctures mark a change in rhythm and a shift in grain pattern. 

When I build these collages, I imagine how an archaeologist reassembles potsherds from a dig site to rebuild an original object. I expect that archaeologists and conservators come to a successful reconstruction after a number of attempts that are awkward and uneven.

Untitled
       
     
Untitled

2014; Collage